An Egg a Day is OK!

Looking for a super food in your diet?

Turn to eggs. Eggs pack a nutritious punch with several key nutrients that contribute to good health. They are one of nature’s most nourishing creations. Eggs are an affordable, convenient source of high quality protein with varying amounts of the 13 essential vitamins and minerals. To top it off one egg has only 70 calories, so eggs are considered a nutrient dense food, meaning a high amount of nutrition compared to their calorie content. In addition, scientists often use egg protein as the standard against which they judge all other proteins. Based on the essential amino acids it provides, egg protein is second only to mother’s milk for human nutrition. All this great nutrition for only 15 cents an egg!

You may wonder which part of the egg is better for you, the yolk or white. If it’s protein you’re after, don’t rely on the whites alone. While they supply about 60 percent of an egg’s protein – as well as niacin, riboflavin, magnesium, and potassium – the yolks steal the nutritional show. Contributing to eye health and brain function, the bright yellow center contains many other key vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D, selenium, riboflavin, phosphorus, B12 and more.

Cholesterol is also found in the yolk, but more than 40 years of research has shown that healthy adults can eat eggs without significantly affecting their risk for heart disease. According to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrition data, eggs are lower in cholesterol than previously recorded. The USDA recently reviewed the nutrient composition of standard large eggs and results show the average amount of cholesterol in one large egg is 185 mg., a 14 percent decrease. For pregnant women, whole eggs can be particularly important for their abundance of B vitamins – nutrients that influence a baby’s brain and nervous system development. Eggs also contain vitamin D, which increases the body’s metabolism of calcium and assists with proper immune function.